timelightbox:

Photo: Steve McCurry—Magnum
The Photo That Made Me: Steve McCurry, Mexico City 1972
TIME LightBox talks to Steve McCurry as part of our new series The Photo That Made Me, in which photographers tell us about the one photograph they made that they believe jump-started their career, garnered them international attention, or simply sparked an interest in photography.

timelightbox:

Photo: Steve McCurry—Magnum

The Photo That Made Me: Steve McCurry, Mexico City 1972

TIME LightBox talks to Steve McCurry as part of our new series The Photo That Made Me, in which photographers tell us about the one photograph they made that they believe jump-started their career, garnered them international attention, or simply sparked an interest in photography.

Spanish photographer wins NPPA’s ‘Best Of Photojournalism’ Award
Susana Vera, a Spanish photojournalist from Pamplona, was recently recognized as ‘Best Of Photojournalism in Sports Action' by the National Press Photographers Association, for this breathtaking photo of a Pamplonada participant being injured by the hook of a bull.
Image: Sports Action Spotlight, via the NPPA website (click to see other honorary mentions). 

Spanish photographer wins NPPA’s ‘Best Of Photojournalism’ Award

Susana Vera, a Spanish photojournalist from Pamplona, was recently recognized as ‘Best Of Photojournalism in Sports Action' by the National Press Photographers Association, for this breathtaking photo of a Pamplonada participant being injured by the hook of a bull.

Image: Sports Action Spotlight, via the NPPA website (click to see other honorary mentions). 

A paperless media revolution in Spain 
El hombre periódico (the newspaper man) is an aging public performer who is always after tourists’s tips at Plaza del Sol, in downtown Madrid.
But for the locals, his aesthetics and performance also tell an interesting story about print media: across the country, web-only startups staffed by mix of veteran and young journalists are challenging old guard amid row over media impartiality. 
The Guardian goes at length on this issue:

Many explain the changes in leadership at El País, El Mundo and La Vanguardia by pointing to the country’s economic crisis, which has caused advertising revenue to shrink and circulations to drop. Others evoke a storyline familiar to newspapers the world over: the migration of readers from print to the internet.
But media analysts in Spain say there is another factor in play. Nearly 40 years after the country’s transition to democracy, there have been more than 300 journalism startups. Staffed by a mix of veteran journalists laid off during the economic crisis and young journalists trying to gain a foothold in an industry where few are hiring, the startups tout themselves as willing to ask the questions that traditional Spanish media will not. Read More»

Bonus: For some background on what is going on with traditional media in Spain, we recently took on the dismissal of Pedro J. Ramírez from the El Mundo newspaper. He was its founding editor.
FJP: Two of the most influential Spanish web-only startups are the center-right El Confidencial and the left-leaning ElDiario. Both account for more than 5 million hits a month. 
Image: ‘El hombre periódico’ via La Biblioteca del Colegio San Juan Bautista.

A paperless media revolution in Spain 

El hombre periódico (the newspaper man) is an aging public performer who is always after tourists’s tips at Plaza del Sol, in downtown Madrid.

But for the locals, his aesthetics and performance also tell an interesting story about print media: across the country, web-only startups staffed by mix of veteran and young journalists are challenging old guard amid row over media impartiality. 

The Guardian goes at length on this issue:

Many explain the changes in leadership at El País, El Mundo and La Vanguardia by pointing to the country’s economic crisis, which has caused advertising revenue to shrink and circulations to drop. Others evoke a storyline familiar to newspapers the world over: the migration of readers from print to the internet.

But media analysts in Spain say there is another factor in play. Nearly 40 years after the country’s transition to democracy, there have been more than 300 journalism startups. Staffed by a mix of veteran journalists laid off during the economic crisis and young journalists trying to gain a foothold in an industry where few are hiring, the startups tout themselves as willing to ask the questions that traditional Spanish media will not. Read More»

Bonus: For some background on what is going on with traditional media in Spain, we recently took on the dismissal of Pedro J. Ramírez from the El Mundo newspaper. He was its founding editor.

FJP: Two of the most influential Spanish web-only startups are the center-right El Confidencial and the left-leaning ElDiario. Both account for more than 5 million hits a month. 

Image: ‘El hombre periódico’ via La Biblioteca del Colegio San Juan Bautista.

Android in Cuba: Offline is better.

Cuban blogger extraordinaire Yoani Sánchez has an interesting take on why most social media and news apps won’t thrive among Cuban smartphone owners any time soon: almost everyone is still offline.

"In order to ease the limitations of living in the ‘Island of the Disconnected’," she says, "local users prefer those that work without access to the Internet." Hence the prevalence of apps originally designed to work offline (i.e. maps, illustrated encyclopedias, translators, role-play games, and tools for the everyday life).

In her piece, she went on to mention the 10 most popular Android apps among Cubans, according to local cell phone repairers. Here they are, all contained in a single screenshot:

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How does it compare to the collection of apps you have in your smartphone?

FJP: Yoani didn’t include any info on whether the apps are downloaded for free, or at least legally. We are just assuming it, though. 

Image: Grabbed screenshot, via The Huffington Post. 

"Good thing we ended up investigating Nixon and not Rajoy." 
This is not the best time for newspapers to thrive, we all now that. Yet, as if failing business models were not enough, there is always another threat: governments trying to control the mastheads. 
Spain is no exception. This cartoon, based on a classic picture of the Washington Post reporters who broke the Watergate scandal, appeared yesterday on the Spanish newspaper El Mundo, after its founding editor Pedro J. Ramírez (to whom this cartoon is dedicated) was dismissed as head of the paper.
But rather than blaming his dismissal on the newspaper’s financial losses, Pedro J. wrote a long letter (in Spanish) accusing Spain’s government of engineering retribution for El Mundo’s recent reporting on a series of corruption cases.
These are his words, as told to The new York Times:

This is a show of force by a government that wants to send a message, not just to El Mundo, but to the whole media sector, that whoever acts in a way that the government sees as inconvenient will pay the consequences.
What is happening under [Prime Minister Mariano] Rajoy is particularly serious because it’s about using a time of clear economic weakness to force the media to be docile, servile and practice self-censorship.
I don’t want to present myself as a martyr or a victim, but I do think that what is happening in El Mundo is a symptom of how the quality of democracy is falling back under Rajoy.

FJP: Sounds familiar?
Image: Cartoon by Idígoras y Pachi, via El Mundo. 

"Good thing we ended up investigating Nixon and not Rajoy." 

This is not the best time for newspapers to thrive, we all now that. Yet, as if failing business models were not enough, there is always another threat: governments trying to control the mastheads. 

Spain is no exception. This cartoon, based on a classic picture of the Washington Post reporters who broke the Watergate scandal, appeared yesterday on the Spanish newspaper El Mundo, after its founding editor Pedro J. Ramírez (to whom this cartoon is dedicated) was dismissed as head of the paper.

But rather than blaming his dismissal on the newspaper’s financial losses, Pedro J. wrote a long letter (in Spanish) accusing Spain’s government of engineering retribution for El Mundo’s recent reporting on a series of corruption cases.

These are his words, as told to The new York Times:

This is a show of force by a government that wants to send a message, not just to El Mundo, but to the whole media sector, that whoever acts in a way that the government sees as inconvenient will pay the consequences.

What is happening under [Prime Minister Mariano] Rajoy is particularly serious because it’s about using a time of clear economic weakness to force the media to be docile, servile and practice self-censorship.

I don’t want to present myself as a martyr or a victim, but I do think that what is happening in El Mundo is a symptom of how the quality of democracy is falling back under Rajoy.

FJP: Sounds familiar?

Image: Cartoon by Idígoras y Pachi, via El Mundo

When in Brazil, do not tell anyone you’re a writer. Not only will they deny you credit at the grocery store, but almost certainly they will laugh at you, asking right away: “No, seriously. What do you do for a living?” Unless your name is Paulo Coelho, writing is seen as about as useful and profitable as whale-snot collecting.

Writer Vanessa Barbara in a rather satirical op-ed for The New York Times. Good points made there.

Drawing the Line: Photographing the Drug War in Mexico

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Mexican Federal Police officers stand on top of handcuffed drug cartel assassins after arresting them in a gun battle—the assassins had gone on a killing spree in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Mexican police are well known for corruption, human rights abuses and in many cases working in partnership with cartels. In 2008 only 38 percent of Mexican police had their high school diploma. The U.S. aid program to fight drug cartels known as the Merida Initiative supplies mostly weapons and equipment to Mexican security forces. Image by © Louie Palu/ZUMA. Mexico, 2012.

Read The Atlantic’s interview with Louie Palu, a Pulitzer Center journalist who documented the violence of the drug war along the US/Mexico border:

"I feel that organized crime groups pose a greater risk to each one of us on a daily basis than terrorists or the Taliban," Palu said. "Their daily goal is to corrupt all government and law enforcement in order to carry out their business on both sides of the border."

FJP: This reminded us of that NYT Lens piece on Shaul Schwarz we mentioned a while ago.

(via PulitzerCenter)

There is no doubt that the newspaper has increasingly become less an information source. When the newspaper reaches our doorstep every morning, we already know much of what ir reports. This is not to say that their function is already irrelevant. On the contrary, the change creates a new space for the journalistic rigor and depth that “new media” tend to despise. Yet, I think the worst temptation is to be fall for the offer of the new player, and surrender to its aesthetic code, to its pace, to its appetite.

It seems that my newspaper [Reforma] is ready to free more room for famous derrières (of either artists or politicians), and less for the long careful reportage, the serious reliable journalism, and those news pieces written with much respect for language, information, and the people. My newspaper is losing direction by gravitating toward the power of graphics, by getting rid of smart collaborations, by destroying any sense of priority, by shedding a thin-but-always-pertinent Culture section, giving in to frivolity as never before. I am saying this here because this is where it must be said.

Writer Jesús Silva-Herzog Márquez in his weekly op-ed (in Spanish) at Periódico Reforma (Mexico City), after the unveiling of a radical new visual design of its print version (paywall) in time for their 20th Anniversary. 

Background: For illustration:

When writing a reportage, we should never put the reader to work. A dose of suspense about the fate of the characters and the ending of the story does capture the attention of the people who are reading it, but if the central topic of the article is not clearly explained, they will probably desist from finishing it.
Journalist Jon Lee Anderson, in a reportage workshop organized by Fundación Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano taking place this week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Why Photojournalist Samuel Aranda Won't Give His Work Away For Free

  • Random House Mondadori: Dear Samuel, I am writing from Random House Mondadori, specifically from the Grijalbo Ilustrados division, to let you know that we are preparing a graphic edition of a book by Javier Menendez Flores that has already been authorized by Extremoduro. It would be our pleasure to run the photo (screenshot below) of poet Marcos Ana next to the text referred to him. Would it be possible for you to send me the file of said picture and your permission to reproduce it? I look forward to your reply. Regards, Cesar Cañete.
  • Samuel Aranda: Dear Cesar. How are you? No problem, I will send you the photograph and a re-printing permission. What are your rates for running this photograph? Greetings, Samuel.
  • Random House Mondadori: Dear Samuel, thanks for your quick response. Since we are talking about an Extremoduro book, all the other photographers I have spoken to have shown no interest in monetary retribution. I do not know, what do you think? We have a pretty tight budget but we can take a look. Regards, Cesar Ibarguren.
  • Samuel Aranda: Dear Cesar. What's up? I do not quite understand the concept "Since we are talking about an Extremoduro book, they are not interested in retribution." I have a habit of charging for my work. And I am surprised that a company as big as Random House Mondadori is asking for free photos, I am very surprised. My rate for publication in a book would be 800 euros, granting rights for a single publication, without permission to keep the file. You tell me. Greetings, Samuel.
  • Random House Mondadori: Dear Samuel, good morning. I'm sorry if I did not clarify well what I meant. The fact that this is a book authorized by Extremoduro has proven as an attractive enterprise for photographers enthusiastic about contributing for free to such a unique project in the market of Spanish-language graphic books. Especially because the project has already been approved by an institution that believes we are the best team out there to deliver a product that meets their expectations and those of their fans. Although Random House is a large company, each book has its own budget, and the fact that it is profusely illustrated in order to level the graphic quality and the text, makes it very expensive to produce. That forces us to reduce expenses as much as possible and to try, without the intention of reducing the quality of the book, a collaboration with those photographers who are willing to share their work without pay. Not to devaluate their work and its importance, on the contrary, otherwise we would not even try to include it in the book. Your fee of 800 euros for the photo of Marcos Ana is out of our budget and forces us to look for an alternative. I hope we can find a solution. Thank you very much. Regards, Cesar.
  • Samuel Aranda: Dear Cesar, good morning. I guess Extremoduro charges for its performances, CDs and books, I guess you get paid for the work you're doing in producing this book, I guess Random House will make ​​money with this book, and I guess fans will have to pay in order to buy this book, right?? So, can you explain why would I have to give my work away for free? I'm sure you will find some amateur photographers or students who are willing to send their work for the simple fact that their names will appear in the book, I'm sure you will succeed! Anyways.. Greetings. Samuel. [via http://is.gd/4Xmr9m]