In Cuba, doing away with Soviet-like censorship
A recent article (in Spanish) sheds light on the imminent change in the Cuban press, amid the upcoming National Congress of Journalists (in Spanish).
Via the Agence France-Presse:

The state-controlled Union of Cuban Journalists has officially called to reflect on “what kind of revolutionary journalism is required in Cuban today, according to the major changes occurring nowadays in our society”.
Reviled by dissidents, even criticized by president Raúl Castro, and devalued by the general public due to hollow and apologetic journalism, the Cuban press seems now obliged to drift towards a substantial change.
Two newspapers and one weekly of national circulation, two news agencies, five TV broadcasting stations, 10 regional newspapers, a dozen magazines and more than 50 radio stations. All of them still run the same news pieces over and over again (e.g. Granma) in a country where internet access is very limited.

Bonus: Cuba lifts 50-year old radio ban on anti-Castro artists and musicians.
Image: Newspaper salesman in downtown Havana, by Adalberto Roque. Via El Nuevo Herald. 

In Cuba, doing away with Soviet-like censorship

A recent article (in Spanish) sheds light on the imminent change in the Cuban press, amid the upcoming National Congress of Journalists (in Spanish).

Via the Agence France-Presse:

The state-controlled Union of Cuban Journalists has officially called to reflect on “what kind of revolutionary journalism is required in Cuban today, according to the major changes occurring nowadays in our society”.

Reviled by dissidents, even criticized by president Raúl Castro, and devalued by the general public due to hollow and apologetic journalism, the Cuban press seems now obliged to drift towards a substantial change.

Two newspapers and one weekly of national circulation, two news agencies, five TV broadcasting stations, 10 regional newspapers, a dozen magazines and more than 50 radio stations. All of them still run the same news pieces over and over again (e.g. Granma) in a country where internet access is very limited.

Bonus: Cuba lifts 50-year old radio ban on anti-Castro artists and musicians.

Image: Newspaper salesman in downtown Havana, by Adalberto Roque. Via El Nuevo Herald

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